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Goats Milk Cheese Recipes – How to Make Feta The Easy Way

Goat Milk Cheese Recipes

If you have goats you need to have lots of ideas for things to make with goats milk. Because in the spring, if you decide to milk  your goats you have lots of extra around.  While I do freeze much of my goats milk, I have come across a couple super simple recipes for making cheeses. But you don’t even have to have goats to make these 3 goats milk cheese recipes! You can buy goats milk in the store.

The first of the milk cheese recipes I’m going to teach you is how to make a cream cheese:

To make cream cheese – which I like to spice up you will first need to make yogurt out of your goats milk. You can buy plain Greek yogurt and make it from there.

How to make yogurt from goat’s milk:

 

  • 1/2 gal milk
  • 2- 3 tbs fresh plain yogurt

Heat up to 110 degrees then pour over yogurt, set 1/2 gal jar on top fridge for 12 hours

I’m pretty sure he went and found that lid pretty quickly. You never want to leave your yogurt exposed like that because you will end up with not very friendly bacteria quickly.

Now to make the cheese spread, also known as Labne, this is what you will do:

 

You can also use Italian herbs instead of garlic and mint. You don’t have to use the olive oil. It goes really great with zucchini or yellow squash chips. These are dehydrated zucchini sliced into chips.

Now for the Feta  Goats Milk Cheese Recipe:

Ingredients:

1 gallon of whole milk – Pasteurized NOT ultra pasteurized
Warm milk to 80 degrees
2 teaspoon of salt
½ teaspoon 30% calcium chloride solution dissolved in 2 Tablespoon of water (if you are using raw goats milk you don’t need this)
1/8 teaspoon mild lipase powder dissolved in 2 Tablespoon of water
1/8 teaspoon Mesophilic A culture
30 drops of vegetable rennet dissolved into 1/4 cup of water

I use raw goat’s milk, salt, yogurt, lipase powder and junket tablets. You can get them in the grocery store. Use 1/2 tablet per gallon of milk.

For a cheese press I have a #10 can that I took the top and bottom off of, a bowl, cheese cloth. Use Muslin, not the cheese cloth that you get from the grocery store. And a weight, which for me is sometimes a mason jar filled with water. Or you can use a bar bell.

You would take out the lid piece put your cheese cloth down inside so that the edges go out over the top, then put in  your curds. Next folld the cloth back over the curds then put the “follower/top” back on. Finally put your weights on that. If you use a shallow bowl like this one you need to hang around and every little go dump out the whey/water that will collect in the bowl.

Before you get ready to press your curds you can also add in dried tomatoes, and/or Italian seasonings or basil. You can always leave it plain, but in my world view, spice is the zest of life!

Simple Farm Style Goats Milk Cheese With Monterrey Jack with Peppers

  • 3 gallons of milk (I like mine raw)
  • 2 tablets of junket (you can find these in the baking aisle of most grocery stores)
  • 1/2 pint of buttermilk
  • salt
  • dried peppers

Heat your milk and buttermilk up to 90 degrees slowly (well as slowly as your temperament will allow). Let this sit and mellow for a couple hours.

3 goat milk cheese recipes. Feta, cream cheese & mozerella #goatmilkcheese #fetacheese #homemadecheeserecipes

Next step is to add the junket tablets to water (non chlorinated works best) about 1/4 cup just to dissolve the tablets before adding to the milk. After they dissolve add the mixture to the milk. Stir for about a minute to make sure the rennet gets well distributed.

After an hour or so (or even over night) your curds should be separated. Cut them into cubes in the pot. Using a long knife make a checker board pattern all the way down the curds, then start cutting through the curds at an angle all around the pot. The object is to have lots of one inch pieces of curds.

Now that  you have the curds cut, heat the curds and whey back up to 100 degrees slowly, stirring the curds gently.

Let them sit for another hour.

The next step is to strain the curds into cheese cloth (muslin) lined in a colander mix in your salt and peppers to taste. I use about 3 tbs salt and peppers for this recipe.

Ladle  your curds into a press and press under as much pressure as you can for eight to twelve hours. I use hand weights with my presses, but you can use water in jugs, put a can on the follower. (that piece that goes on top of the cheese cloth – I use the end of the #10 can) then put a plate or board over that and add your weights.  The harder you press your cheese the firmer it will be.

milk cheese recipes cheese pressOf course you could always buy a real cheese press and then  you wouldn’t have to be jury rigging stuff LOL

Once it is pressed, cut it into the size of pieces your family will use within a couple days (this doesn’t hold very well and will mold). Rub salt on the exposed parts, wrap in paper towels and then put in a plastic bag that you suck the air out of with a straw before completely sealing.

Freeze these. Let them defrost at room temperature before using.

NOTE:

Don’t throw your whey away!! Use it to make Whey good bread or pizza dough by substituting the whey instead of water in  your recipe. You can freeze it in plastic ziplock bags for use when you are ready to make your bread or pizza dough.

Make cheese, it’s easy and fun and there is something about eating and serving homemade cheese that makes it special, because you know where it came from and what went into it.

 When I first started making cheese this is the kit I used to “get my feet wet”. Simple recipe/directions are included and everything (except the milk) you need to make mozzarella and ricotta cheese. cheese making kitNow if you are wanting to use up your goat’s milk because you have so much of it you don’t know what to do with, perhaps you might want to start with this kit that has the ingredients you need to make goats milk cheese.

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Homemade Goat Milk Soap Recipe For Beginners fast & easy Get Stunning Results

Goats Milk Soap Recipe For Beginners
Get Great Results making goat milk soap

Having been a soap maker for quite a few years now, I have discovered this secret almost by accident and now make wonderfully luxurious cream colored goat’s milk soap.  Using this secret disclosed in the homemade goat milk soap recipe for beginners,  you will be making great soap for your family and friends too, with very little headache.

Easy To Find Ingredients

Most of these ingredients can be purchased at your local grocery or health food store, except for the lye (sodium hydroxide) that will need to come from an online source probably Amazon. You can get smaller quantities from them and it is shipped without hassle for a reasonable price.  It is hard to keep 50 pounds of lye around if you aren’t making soap in large quantities. 50 Pounds is the quantity sold most commonly by soap maker supply companies.

What you need to make Goats Milk Soap For Beginners

As far as utensils go; it really depends on how much soap you plan to make. This recipe will make about three pounds of soap – enough to cover the bottom of a Campbell’s soup box (you know the cardboard that holds a case of soup). If you cut it in half then you could make 8 bars in soap molds.

I like to use an enamel pot that has high sides. I melt the solid oils together first over low, then add the olive oil so cool the oils down to 100degrees. And then when I mix the lye solution in I’m less likely to splash the mixture on myself. (Vinegar is the neutralizing agent for lye – keep it out and handy if you get some lye or lye mixture on you, douse with vinegar and it will stop the burning).

Though you may be tempted to make this without safety glasses, refrain. Wear those glasses! And gloves.  Wear gloves.

Okay, enough on the safety warnings. I’m sure you have your own mother to mutter these little warnings to  you so you don’t need me.

I have a plastic pitcher, a wooden spoon and a separate little glass container that I use for all things lye related. You can get  all of the supplies you need to make soap here

Here is the list:

  • An enamel or stainless steel pot (it doesn’t have to be real big)
  • 1 plastic pitcher
  • 2 wooden spoons
  • 1 stick blender (doesn’t really need to be dedicated to making soap, but be sure to wash it well)
  • 1 kitchen scale (the balance scales work okay for this recipe,  you will need a serious scale for most soap recipes though)
  • 2 glass thermometers
  • safety glasses
  • plastic gloves
  • vinegar on hand
  • a big plastic or glass bowl to set your lye mixture pitcher in.

That is it!

This is the homemade goat milk soap recipe for beginners:

  • 18 oz slushy goat’s milk – This can be from the grocery store, from a friend, from your goat, or powered that has been reconstituted. It also needs to be partially frozen for best results.
  • 6 oz water
  • 6 oz lye (sodium hydroxide)
  • 10 oz coconut oil
  • 24 oz of shortening or lard
  • 9 oz olive oil

That is it!

Learn to make goats milk soap perfectly even if you are a beginner with stuff you mostly can find at your local grocer

Here is the secret to getting cream colored goat’s milk soap

Rather than the orange/brown stuff that most beginners end up with. The reason goat’s milk soap turns brown is because the lye causes the milk solids to burn. The way around that problem is to mix the lye with water first, then mix the lye into the oils and then add the milk.

Another important point is that  you want  your lye solution and your oil to be about the same temperature and that temperature needs to be 100 degrees. It does make a difference.

I like to mix my lye solution over an ice bath. So I put the pitcher in a big bowl full of ice, mix the lye into the water s l o w l  y   so it doesn’t explode and then drop ice cubes down into the solution to get it to cool down quicker. I’m so not the patient type.

Here are the steps to the Homemade Goat Milk Soap Recipe for Beginners:

  • Heat the coconut oil and shortening/lard until it melts in the big pot. Take it off the heat and add olive oil.  Set aside to cool.
  • Put on your safety glasses and gloves
  • Put the pitcher in the ice bath add the water and then the lye to the water.
  • Once both are the same temperature, 100 degrees, mix the lye into the oils (DO NOT DO THIS THE OTHER WAY AROUND )
  • Add the milk.
  • Use the stick blender to mix and blend. Do this in pulses of 20 seconds or you will burn out your blender. Between pulses stir with the blender.
  • When the concoction traces it will look like vanilla pudding. Trace just means that it hold the shape of a swirl, like, as I said, vanilla pudding.
soap trace

Once it begins to trace add your essential oil and extra stuff. I like to use lavender oil and lavender bits, but you can add almost anything. If you are planning to add oatmeal, you need to grind it up first. Take it from me, the whole oats things doesn’t work so well, I know, I’ve tried it.

Adding Stuff To Your Soap

When it comes to adding essential oils, I only add a few drops. For honey/oatmeal soap, I add about 1/4 cup of honey and a cup of oats. Also I have found that sandalwood oil can cause your soap to seize. (turns hard really fast) so go slow when adding that.

Make sure that you have lined your cardboard molds with wax paper before you start if you are planning to use cardboard molds. Pour your mixture into the mold after it has traced and you’ve added all your stuff and made sure it traced again.

Before you Cut Your Soap

Let the soap sit in the mold for 24 hours – it will harden up. You then want to dump it out and cut it into the shapes you want. Let it cure for at least 2-3 weeks before using. Enjoy!

The whole process shouldn’t take you more than maybe an hour from start to finish.

If you have questions ask them below, I follow this blog pretty closely and love to help new soap makers get started!

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Don’t forget to grab your copy of The Soap Maker’s Journal so that you can keep your recipes in one place. Every time I make soap I always do something a little different. Recording the adjustments in this journal allows me to repeat success and avoid repeating unwanted results.

Soap maker's journal for bath and body product crafters. Keep all your notes in one place. #soapmaking #homemadesoap #goatsmilksoap @hart_nana
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Cold Process Soap A Tale Of Re Batching

re batching cold process soap

DustyFrame Shares with us her experience with re batching cold process soap because it did not turn out the first time around. I have had similar problems and this was my solution also.

 

Here is Dusty’s story About Cold Process Soap Re Batching:

I’m still learning this whole soap making thing. I enjoy it and think I’m getting closer to figuring it out.

This was batch #3 and I didn’t know that citrus essential oils don’t do very well in cold process soap making. I used tangerine essential oil in it as well as grated orange peel for a little bit of “scrubby”.

I used tumeric to color it and while it looked nice as a bar, it didn’t smell like much of anything other than orange peel.

I’m not about to waste a whole pound of soap, so I decided to rebatch it.

Soap disaster? Don't throw it out, rebatch it

Here’s what I did.

1. Grate the soap.

2. I added 1/8 c. of Goat’s Milk and a splash of olive oil.

3. I put it in a warm oven 170 in this enamel pan. I checked it every 15 minutes. It did take a fair amount of time until it melted. I just stirred it every time I checked it. Eventually, it looked like this.

4. Then I stirred in peppermint essential oil and some more tangerine–ok I should give up the tangerine because it really didn’t work. I also added about 1 TB of honey.

5. Pour it into the mold–this one happens to be a Rubbermaid drawer organizer that I found at the thrift store for fifty cents.

6. I unmolded it as soon as it cooled. Since it was a rebatch it didn’t need to set as long as fresh cold process soap does.

I learned from this batch a few things.

1. Skip the citrus essential oils.

2. I don’t really care for the scent of orange peels but they are a nice scrubby additive.

3. Tumeric makes a really nice pumpkin color and I’ll probably use it again to color some spicey or fall scented soaps.

4. I’d rather get the soap right the 1st time than do rebatching. It’s not really my thing, but it was better than wasting it.

5. Rebatching requires a lot less liquid than I used. The goat’s milk, olive oil, and honey was too much. It required a lot longer time to dry than it should have and it’s still not a super hard bar of soap.

 

The tools you need to accomplish soap rebatching all in one place:

sturdy gratersturdy graterGet it Hererotary graterrotary graterGet it Hereessential oilsessential oilsGet it Here6 pack soap mold6 pack soap moldGet it Herebox soap moldbox soap moldGet it Here6 piece flower soap mold6 piece flower soap moldGet it Here

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Living The Homestead Life Becoming Self Sufficient Is a Process

living the homestead life

Reflecting back I’ve come to realize that living the homestead life is a process of becoming self sufficient.

When I first started this journey, I had no idea goats had no upper teeth. Or how to make bread from scratch.I had not clue whether you needed a rooster to get chicken eggs. Or how to incubate and raise baby chicks. There are so many things that I have learned over the last decade. I look forward to sharing what I have learned and continue to learn with you.

How I got Started Living The Homestead Life

My father in law bought me a copy of Carla Emery’s book, The Encyclopedia of Country Living years ago. At the back of the book is a test.  A sort of living the homesteading life have you become self sufficient yet test. Looking at the test now, I know how to do everything she has listed. This wasn’t the case when I first got the book though.

The Backyard HomesteadThe Backyard HomesteadGet it HereThe Encyclopedia of Country LivingThe Encyclopedia of Country LivingGet it HereHomesteading From ScratchHomesteading From ScratchGet it HereHomesteadingHomesteadingGet it Here

Enjoying the journey

Much like gardening, becoming self sufficient is a process of adding to the knowledge you are gleaning, making adaptations, talking to old timers and finding out what works for you.

There are many people who live in urban settings. Urban homesteads are becoming popular. Gone are the days when you needed acres of land to produce enough food for your family. Many are doing it with a normal quarter to third acre lot in the middle of big cities. Some even homestead on roof tops!

Once we retire, my husband and I will be homesteading from a 5th wheel. Think it can’t be done? There are so many ways to grow food and a couple chickens don’t take up that much space.

As with everything you do in life, you need to make the decision that homestead life is the lifestyle you wish to lead. Becoming more self sufficient will naturally move you towards a more natural way of life. One of the perks is that you will find you health improves as you eat more homegrown food.

One of the things I love the most about living the homestead life is that  there is always something new to learn, explore, enjoy. There are stories that grow from the journey. It is a good life. So satisfying to know that should everything collapse tomorrow, you will be part of the solution not adding to the problem.

Along the way you meet other like minded individuals who share your passion for different aspects of the country life.

There are a ton of places to find specific information about living the homestead life. If you are just beginning your journey, even if you are living in the city, I highly recommend that you get a copy of The Encyclopedia of Country Living, a hard copy, so that you have a solid reference book should you be without power.

Pick one thing at a time to focus on. I started with chickens. They are easy to raise. They don’t take much in terms of shelter and they produce eggs (and meat if you aren’t too squeamish). With all of the messing going on with the food supply, I feel much more comfortable “knowing” the meat I eat.

As you get comfortable with your first accomplishment, move on to another self sufficient living skill and conquer it. Before you know it, you will be living the homestead life too.

fairy gardenfairy gardenGet it HereIndoor wall planterIndoor wall planterGet it Here5 Tier Stackable Strawberry5 Tier Stackable StrawberryGet it HereIndoor Herb GardenIndoor Herb GardenGet it HereGourment Herb GardenGourment Herb GardenGet it Here

Come join us over on Facebook follow along on our living the homestead life adventures.

 

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Goat Milk Lotion Microbial Test Kit

microbial test kit for lotion

Several people have asked about testing Goat Milk Lotion to make sure that it is safe so I thought I’d address the requirements according to the FDA and give you all some options to ensure the safety of your products. At the end you will find a link to a home version of the goat milk lotion microbial test kit for your personal use.

test-kit

The Federal Drug Administration considers a cosmetic by this definition:

“articles intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the human body…for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance” [FD&C Act, sec. 201(i)].  This applies to any product that is used as perfume, lipstick, fingernail polish, skin moisturizers, shampoo, permanent wave solution, hair color solution, tooth paste, deodorants and any other products used in the making of a cosmetic product.While the FDA does not provide testing they do require that you create your products safely and it is your responsibility to ensure that your product is safe for use. Any lab tests would be your responsibility.You are legally responsible for creating safe cosmetics and the only way to be certain that  your lotions that you created from scratch meets these safety requirements is to have them challenge tested by a lab.

A lab challenge test is performed by a trained professional. The cosmetics are tested for adequacy of preservation against microbial contamination which could occur under the reasonably use by a consumer. The product does not have to be sterile, but they must not contain pathogens and the amount of non pathogenic material must be low.

Here are listings for several labs that will perform this test for you.

Adamson Analytical Laboratories, Inc.
Vicky Seto
220 Crouse Street
Corona, CA 92879
USA
phone: (951)-549-9657
fax: (951)-549-9659
[email protected]
www.adamsonlab.com
BioScreen Testing Services, Inc.
Angie Inouye
3905 Del Amo Blvd
Torrance, CA 90503
phone:  310-214-0043
fax: 310-370-3642
[email protected]
www.bioscreen.com
Clinical Research Laboratories, Inc.
Shannon Crowder
371 Hoes Lane
Piscataway, NJ 08854
USA
phone: 732-981-1616
fax: 732-981-0520
[email protected]
www.crl-inc.com
Hill Top Research, Inc.
Charles M. Folk
3225 N. 75th Street
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
USA
phone: 800-785-2693
fax: 480-946-2179
[email protected]
www.hill-top.com

Q Laboratories, Inc
David G. Goins
1400 Harrison Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45214-1606
phone:  513-471-1300
fax: 513-471-5600
[email protected]
www.qlaboratories.com

You can also purchase a microbial test kit if you are wanting to be more confident about the composition of your products.

This home use Microbial test kit will give you a good idea what the bacterial colonies, yeast colonies and fungal colonies are like in any of your goat milk lotion creations.

microbial-test-kit

 Bacteria colonies: 100, 1000, 10’000, 100’000, 1 million, and 10 millions – Microbial Test Kit Results

fungus

Microbial Test Kit Results: Fungi colonies: slight, moderate, and heavy

yeast

 

 

 

 

 Yeast colonies:Microbial Test Kit Results: 100, 1000, 10’000, 100’000, and 1 million

microbial test kit for lotion

Having had my goat milk tested by the local agriculture inspector, I have come to realize how crucial it is get your milk cold fast – even milking into sterile jars immersed in ice with salt sprinkled on it. (salt sprinkled on the ice). Bacteria grows fast, especially in warm conditions. Keep this in mind while you are creating your goat milk lotions, getting your lotion cold quickly after you have created it will keep the growth of bacterial, yeast and fungi down to a minimum.  We covered the use of preservatives over in our article: Preservatives in Lotion and Why You Must Use Them

 

 

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homemade goat milk soap recipe

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