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Dehydrating Potatoes – Get Stunning Results With One Simple Trick

dehydrating potatoes - get great results using this one simple trick

Why should we talk about dehydrating potatoes? Well for one thing I’m from Idaho. We are potato people. Which reminds me of a short story involving my family and, well, potatoes.

There we were sitting in a local diner in Idaho that specialized in burgers & fries. We are placing our order for, yes, burgers & fries, when the waiter informs us . . .

THEY HAVE NO POTATOES!

What? I thought we were in Idaho! My daughter leans in and suggests they might run across the road and grab some out of the field. Sigh that didn’t go over well.

Back to Why Dehydrating Potatoes

One can store potatoes in straw or sand or even wood shavings in a cool, dry, dark place. However, eventually, those potatoes are going to start growing. That tends to end up a big mess. To avoid the big mess, I like to dehydrate potatoes for long lasting yummy goodness. They do rehydrate quickly so you can do a lot with them. Of course one can can potatoes too, but that is a story for a different day.

The One Big Secret For Dehydrating Potatoes

The MUST BE PAR BOILED FIRST. The whole process goes like this. First you need to peel your potatoes (unless you want skins, in that case just wash them good) then thinly prepare them in the manner you wish them to be. I like slices, but shredding works too. Keep them in lightly salted water while you work.

Next you need to submerge the potatoes into boiling water for 30 seconds or so. If you miss this step you will end up with little black hockey pucks that work better out on the street than in anything you might want to eat. Just saying, cause we all know, I’ve done that.

Let The Drying Begin

Now that your potatoes are all nice and par boiled lay them out on the dehydrator trays. Let them hang out until they are dry and there is no mushiness about them at all. Read your dehydrator instructions to get the best results. As for me, my dehydrator is old, it has only one setting and I have to roll the trays around to get even heating.

Here are some good dehydrators for dehydrating potatoes.

Cooking With Dehydrated Potatoes

You can soak them in boiling water for a few minutes and they will then reconstitute. After that you can fry them or make scalloped potatoes (we call them funeral potatoes around here) or even add them to soups (don’t re hydrate them in this case). They are very handy if you over salt something too. Throw a couple chips in and as they re hydrate they will soak up the salt.

Go forth and dry your harvest.

If you don't do this one thing your dehydrated potatoes will be black hockey pucks that no one wants to eat. Just saying...
#hartnana #foodpreserving #homesteadhacks
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Living The Homestead Life Becoming Self Sufficient Is a Process

living the homestead life

Reflecting back I’ve come to realize that living the homestead life is a process of becoming self sufficient.

When I first started this journey, I had no idea goats had no upper teeth. Or how to make bread from scratch.I had not clue whether you needed a rooster to get chicken eggs. Or how to incubate and raise baby chicks. There are so many things that I have learned over the last decade. I look forward to sharing what I have learned and continue to learn with you.

How I got Started Living The Homestead Life

My father in law bought me a copy of Carla Emery’s book, The Encyclopedia of Country Living years ago. At the back of the book is a test.¬† A sort of living the homesteading life have you become self sufficient yet test. Looking at the test now, I know how to do everything she has listed. This wasn’t the case when I first got the book though.

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Enjoying the journey

Much like gardening, becoming self sufficient is a process of adding to the knowledge you are gleaning, making adaptations, talking to old timers and finding out what works for you.

There are many people who live in urban settings. Urban homesteads are becoming popular. Gone are the days when you needed acres of land to produce enough food for your family. Many are doing it with a normal quarter to third acre lot in the middle of big cities. Some even homestead on roof tops!

Once we retire, my husband and I will be homesteading from a 5th wheel. Think it can’t be done? There are so many ways to grow food and a couple chickens don’t take up that much space.

As with everything you do in life, you need to make the decision that homestead life is the lifestyle you wish to lead. Becoming more self sufficient will naturally move you towards a more natural way of life. One of the perks is that you will find you health improves as you eat more homegrown food.

One of the things I love the most about living the homestead life is that  there is always something new to learn, explore, enjoy. There are stories that grow from the journey. It is a good life. So satisfying to know that should everything collapse tomorrow, you will be part of the solution not adding to the problem.

Along the way you meet other like minded individuals who share your passion for different aspects of the country life.

There are a ton of places to find specific information about living the homestead life. If you are just beginning your journey, even if you are living in the city, I highly recommend that you get a copy of The Encyclopedia of Country Living, a hard copy, so that you have a solid reference book should you be without power.

Pick one thing at a time to focus on. I started with chickens. They are easy to raise. They don’t take much in terms of shelter and they produce eggs (and meat if you aren’t too squeamish). With all of the messing going on with the food supply, I feel much more comfortable “knowing” the meat I eat.

As you get comfortable with your first accomplishment, move on to another self sufficient living skill and conquer it. Before you know it, you will be living the homestead life too.

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